Neighborhood Notes – 7/1/14

Near Eastside Neighborhood Summit

The next neighborhood summit is next week!

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Directions to Shepherd Community Center

Just in case you’re not familiar with where to go at Shepherd, here’s a map to help you out.

Be Aware of State Fireworks Laws

Use Caution and Be Safe

With the fireworks season in full swing, Indiana citizens and retailers are being reminded of a new state
law governing the use and sale of fireworks. The Indiana Department of Homeland Security (IDHS) Fire &
Building Safety division urges Hoosiers to play it safe when using fireworks this summer.
In 2006, an estimated 9,200 people were injured by fireworks in the United States and had to be treated
in a hospital emergency room according to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA).
“When handled by professionals, a fireworks show may look easy, but each year they cause injury, death
and property damage because of misuse and accidents,” said Jim Greeson, State Fire Marshal.
In March of 2006, Governor Mitch Daniels signed a new law that will help fund important public safety
programs around the state, such as firefighter training, through the collection of a 5-percent safety fee
on the sale of all fireworks. The law also includes requirements regarding where and when consumers
can set off fireworks, as well as requirements for structures where fireworks are sold.
“Hoosiers need to remember that restrictions are in place regarding the use of fireworks, as well as the
possible penalties for violators,” Greeson added. “We want to stress the personal responsibility of each
fireworks consumer. Obey our laws, follow directions for safe use and apply common sense.”

Fireworks law provisions:
Fireworks may be used only on the user’s property; or on the property of someone who has
consented to the use of fireworks; or at a special discharge location.
Fireworks can be purchased only by persons 18 years of age or older and children may possess
or use any kind of firework only when an adult is present.
Penalties for violating the fireworks law can range from a Class A misdemeanor up to a Class C
felony in the case of the reckless or intentional use of fireworks that results in a person’s death.
On Memorial Day, the 4th of July, Labor Day and New Year’s Eve, fireworks may be discharged
from 9 a.m. to midnight. Any other day of the year fireworks may be discharged from 9 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Local laws may further affect fireworks use.
U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission data shows that in 2006, approximately 1,300 people were
injured by fireworks. In addition, approximately 1,000 people were injured by sparklers and 800 by
bottle rockets.
The IDHS Fire & Building Safety Division recommends Hoosiers check the fireworks they purchase to
ensure they contain the following information: Class “C”

Consumer Fireworks
1.4 g   “If you find a package that you cannot read because it is in a foreign language, it says Class ‘B’ fireworks,
or 1.3 g, we strongly encourage you to call the CPSC hotline (800-638-2772),” Greeson added.
Facts (According NFPA statistics)
Approximately 95-percent of all fireworks are produced in China.
In 2006, 49% of emergency room fireworks-related injuries were to the extremities and 46%
were to the head.
55% of the 2006 fireworks injuries were burns, while 30% were contusions and lacerations.
One-third of the people injured by fireworks were under the age of 15.
The risk of fireworks injury was two-and-a-half times as high for children ages 10-14 as for the
general population.
Sparklers, fountains, and novelties alone accounted for 28% of the emergency room fireworks
injuries in 2006.

If you choose to use fireworks, the IDHS Fire & Building Safety Division suggests following these
important safety tips:
Preparation
Obey local laws, including ban of fireworks due to drought.
Buy fireworks from a reliable, licensed dealer.
Read and follow all directions.
Do not alter any fireworks or attempt to make fireworks.
Store fireworks in a cool, dry place away from the reach of children.
Safety glasses are recommended for the person lighting or nearby the fireworks, such as a
helper.

Location and Conditions
Keep a fire extinguisher, water supply, hose or bucket of water nearby.
Use fireworks outdoors, never indoors.
Use in a clear, open area.
Keep spectators a safe distance from the show.
Be cautious of lighting any fireworks during strong wind conditions and light fireworks with
prevailing wind blowing away from the spectators.

Fireworks Use
Don’t allow children to handle, play with, or light any fireworks.
Designate one person to ignite fireworks.
Light only one firework item at a time.
Never attempt to re-light, alter or fix any fireworks.
Never smoke when handling fireworks.
Drinking alcohol and using fireworks do not mix.
Never aim, point or throw fireworks at another person.

Pets and 4th of July

1. Know when fireworks will be happening and how they’ll impact your home.Contact your local municipality to find out when your area is likely to have fireworks. Mark the dates on a calendar so that you can keep track of when to ensure your pets are cared for. If you know or suspect that the fireworks will be heard at your house, take the precautions outlined in the following steps.

  • Check that your pets’ ID tags and microchips are in date; mark the calendar when renewal payments are due and be sure to make the payments. If your pet does go running off during fireworks events, it’s much easier to be able to identify its ownership with these features.
  • Fireworks upset pets as a result of the noise, smell of sulfur, and flashing lights.

2.  Desensitization of noises helps to prevent a phobia of loud noises, use a cd like Sounds Scary, well before the firework season, or after the event.

3.  Prepare the house. The house becomes your pets’ safety zone, so it’s important to prepare it properly.

  • Keep some lights on. Keeping a light on will calm your pet and make him feel more secure, rather than being scared in a dark room.
  • Dampen the noise. Close the curtains in the room and, if your animal is a caged one, cover up the cage in a thick blanket, but make sure it is breathable so your animal doesn’t suffocate. This will also help to stop the flashes of light affecting your pet.
  • Plan to use familiar sounds to drown out the noise of the fireworks. Music from a stereo or turning on the TV are likely familiar sounds that can sooth your pet. Just make sure not to play these sounds ridiculously loud as they can become bothersome themselves.

4.  Prepare the room. Select a suitable room where you will contain the pets for the duration of the fireworks. An inner room that is least impacted by the noise is ideal. It should be a room that you can close off to prevent your pet from running about the house and injuring itself, wrecking furniture, etc. If you have more than one pet, be sure they don’t mind being confined in the same room, or select several rooms for different pets. For example, dogs and cats will usually appreciate being kept separate.

  • Make the room cozy. Put down familiar, clean bedding somewhere pleasant such as under a table, on or behind a chair, etc. Add some familiar chew toys, scratch pads, balls, etc., to keep your pets amused and distracted.
  • Ensure that the room temperature is pleasant; warm if it’s cold weather, or cool if it’s hot weather.
  • Consider whether sound might be soothing. If your pet is used to music, turn some on at normal volume. Also, the sound of rainwater is very soothing to pets.
  • Use lavender. This is optional, but you might like to use lavender scented items to help calm your pet. Use a spray or gently bruise the leaves and flowers of some fresh plants. Just make sure that it’s out of reach of your pet. Using heated scent oils or incense is not recommended as a frantic pet can knock them over and start a fire or injure themselves.
  • Add a litter tray for cats.
  • Remove any sharp items from the room in case your pet starts jumping or running around.

5.  Prepare yourself. In the desire to ease our pet’s pain, sometimes we can transfer some of our anxiety and upset to the pet. If you’ve prepared properly in advance, there is no need to feel upset and worried as you can be reassured about the safety of your pet.

  • Realize that the startled and frantic reactions of your pet are often the principal source of your own upset.  Being ready for their reactions can help to keep you calm as well.


6.  Confine your pet.
 Half an hour to an hour before the fireworks are due to be set off, place your pet into the chosen room. If you’re concerned about not being able to locate your pet (for example, cats aren’t always easy to find), consider finding your pet several hours earlier. Mealtime is a good time to round up every pet, provided it falls before the fireworks are set off. If your dog needs a walk, be sure to walk her before confining her.

  • Even if your pet is caged, place it into the secure and comfortable room you’ve selected.
  • If your pet is a horse or other farm animal, make sure it has clean bedding and is inside the stable or barn.

7.  Provide food and hydration. Be sure to leave sufficient water and food for your pet in the confinement space. Many pets will be uneasy, or even frantic. If your pet has access to water, it will help calm him, and food supplied in your pet’s regular portion will make him feel like it’s a normal day.

8.  Keep an eye on your pet, and if possible, stay with her. Comfort her and talk to her. Be friendly but don’t fuss over her too much; this can increase her anxiety if she picks up on yours and can reward and encourage fearful behavior.  If it’s not possible to stay with her, (perhaps because you’re out or busy (you may be at the firework display), don’t worry – the previous steps should ensure that your pet has been adequately cared for.

  • Allow your pet to hide somewhere in the room if wished. It’s your pet’s way of coping (a “bolthole”)  and dragging them out of a safe spot can increase their anxiety levels. Don’t fuss over her too much.

9.  Check on your pet after the fireworks. Reassure him and remove the protection (blankets, etc.) as long as you’re sure that the loud fireworks are over. Let him have free run of the house to see how he behaves before considering letting him return outside (it might be best to wait until morning, if possible). Check for signs of stress in your pet:[6]

  • For cats, signs of stress include running away, soiling the house, hiding away and refusing to eat.
  • For dogs, signs of stress include barking a lot, running away, soiling the house, hiding and cowering, clinging to owners, whimpering, trembling and shaking, pacing and panting, and refusing to eat.
  • If your pet is stressed, keep him indoors overnight. Keep a litter tray somewhere in the house, or walk a dog after the fireworks but don’t let him off his harness and be sure to stay with him the whole time.

10.  Do a yard sweep before letting your pets back outside. Collect any sparklers, firecrackers, etc., as well as party items and broken objects. This will prevent your pet from being injured by unfamiliar objects.

 

 

 

IMPD East District 8th Annual Community Day

 

Near Eastside Soccer Alliance

So much World Cup excitement is happening this summer! Make sure to get your kids signed up for our Fall soccer leagues which start at the end of August.

Online registrations: http://neareastsoccer.com/

In Person registrations:
Shepherd Community Center
4107 E. Washington St.
July 16th
8 – 10am

Chase Near Eastside Legacy Center
727 N. Oriental
July 26th
9am – noon

 

Feast of Lanterns Vendors

Are you interested in being a vendor for the 2014 NESCO Feast of Lanterns on August 23? Please sign up on our website: http://nescocommunity.org/vendors

IPL Project Greenspace Grants

Keep Indianapolis Beautiful, Inc. is offering Project Greenspace grants to neighbors and community organizations. If you have a project idea, head on over to their website to see how you can apply for these grants. The deadline to apply is July 11th!

For more info check out the Keep Indianapolis Beautiful Website.  http://www.kibi.org/programs/beautification/project-greenspace/

 Individual Development Accounts – John H. Boner Community Center

Rolling Roll Calls

Many NESCO neighborhoods have held IMPD rolling roll calls in their neighborhoods.  These roll calls may (but do not have to)  include food and beverages, a block party, and/or getting neighbors out to meet with IMPD officers in the neighborhood.

If you wish to host a rolling roll call event in your neighborhood, please contact Steve Talley at Steve.Talley@indy.gov

Emerson Heights Rolling Roll Call/Block Party

St. Clair Place Rolling Roll Call

Clogged Sewer Drains

With all of the rain happening this spring/summer, please call Citizens Energy Group to report clogged sewer inlets –

317-924-3311 ext. 2

NESCO Calendar

Make sure to check out the NESCO Calendar on their website http://nescocommunity.org for more events and information.

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